Muzzles and Body Fat

Muzzles and Body Fat

People regularly ask me, why do Greyhounds in the pictures posted all wear muzzles?   It’s not because Greyhounds are aggressive or mean. Actually, generally speaking, they are sweet and playful. The pictures posted are from when I volunteer at Hemopet. When Greyhounds exercise and play in a group, it’s very easy for one dog’s eye tooth (it’s big) to graze and catch the body or neck skin of another. Wearing a muzzle is simply for their protection. When Greyhounds are exercising and playing, it’s very easy for one dog’s eye tooth (it’s big) to graze and catch the body or neck skin of another. The result could be a huge skin tear (like a zipper opening up). Greyhounds have little protective body fat “cushion” underneath their thin skin layer. Our Greyhound Mickey Mouse has a gentle style of play, similar to our other dogs; there isn’t a need for him to wear a muzzle. We monitor playtime since Mickey is so much larger and faster than our other dogs, he’s can be a bit intimidating. Due to Mickey’s thin skin he also needs to be watched hiking through rough terrain. Sharp branches and rocks can tear his skin quickly, just like teeth can from dog...
Happy Tails?

Happy Tails?

Some of you know that recently we adopted a big black 2-year-old Greyhound named “Mickey Mouse”, Mickey is a happy boy who fits right in with Olivia and Bailey. His first few days with us were quiet and uneventful. On Mickey’s 3rd day with us he started to cry when trying to stand up or lay down. Thinking either Mickey had a leg or God forbid a back injury, I made a call to Hemopet’s Dr. Woods. Even though it was near closing, we were told “get him here as fast as you can!”(We love Dr. Woods and his staff!) . Dr. Woods quickly discovered that Mickey had what the Greyhound world calls “Happy Tail”. Being a volunteer at Hemopet I’ve observed Happy Tail more than a few times. Usually, it comes with a lot of blood but Mickey never bled. So what is Happy Tail? One of the amusing characteristics of Greyhounds is they usually have lengthy and somewhat fragile tails. Their happy nature usually shows in joyful wagging of their tails. Skin and hair on Greyhounds are thinner than most other breeds and is prone to skin cuts. When a Greyhound wags their tail quickly against something hard (a corner of a wall, door, cabinet, furniture), it can easily break the skin or fracture a bone. If not prepared, this can be a scary moment and requires swift first-aid action before your home looks like a CSI crime scene. Some injuries are severe enough to cause amputation of the tail. Mickey’s tail was fractured at the base, and his skin was not punctured. Dr. Woods prescribed medication...